Home » Breaking News » Black Britons: The next generation

Black Britons: The next generation

UK Only Article: 
standard article

Issue: 

The brawl begins

Fly Title: 

Black Britons

Rubric: 

A mainly Caribbean community has become a mainly African one—and is poised to become more successful

Main image: 

20160130_BRP004_2.jpg

BLACK British history did not begin in the 20th century. In 1578 George Best, a travelling diarist, wrote of meeting “an Ethiopian as blacke as a cole brought into England”. But it was after the 1940s that Britain’s black population really began to grow, with two waves of immigration. The first, from the 1940s to the 1960s, carried poor Caribbeans to British shores. The second, beginning in the late 1980s, came from Africa, as wealthy Nigerians and Ghanaians arrived alongside rural migrants and refugees from Somalia and Zimbabwe.
Britain’s black population is now about 2m, or just over 3% of the total. The census divides it into two main categories: “black African” and “black Caribbean”. Until the turn of the century, Caribbeans were in the majority. But in the ten years …

Black Britons: The next generation

UK Only Article: 
standard article

Issue: 

The brawl begins

Fly Title: 

Black Britons

Rubric: 

A mainly Caribbean community has become a mainly African one—and is poised to become more successful

Main image: 

20160130_BRP004_2.jpg

BLACK British history did not begin in the 20th century. In 1578 George Best, a travelling diarist, wrote of meeting “an Ethiopian as blacke as a cole brought into England”. But it was after the 1940s that Britain’s black population really began to grow, with two waves of immigration. The first, from the 1940s to the 1960s, carried poor Caribbeans to British shores. The second, beginning in the late 1980s, came from Africa, as wealthy Nigerians and Ghanaians arrived alongside rural migrants and refugees from Somalia and Zimbabwe.
Britain’s black population is now about 2m, or just over 3% of the total. The census divides it into two main categories: “black African” and “black Caribbean”. Until the turn of the century, Caribbeans were in the majority. But in the ten years …